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Pharmaceutical medication treatment options

Pharmaceutical Medication OptionsThere are a number of pharmaceutical medicines available for the treatment of Reflux which may help but are not 100% effective- however, they may see the baby through the "crisis" time whilst the gut slowly matures and 'outgrows" reflux naturally. Outlined below are a a few of the types of medication available in South Africa, but it is not a complete list.

  

It is advisable to research the options available and to take advice from your baby's doctor, when deciding on a treatment for your baby. Once again different medications react differently with each baby, so something that works for one may not work for the next. In addition it may take a little while to get the correct dosage for your baby. These are all things that your Doctor will discuss with you.

  

 

Prokinetic Agent- These medicines were traditionally used a lot as they make the contents of the stomach empty faster thus reducing the amount of milk in the stomach that is able to reflux back. However, certain prokinetics have been taken off the market as they caused unwanted side effects.

  

H2-receptor blockers- These medicines limit acid secretion by blocking the histamine receptors in the parietal cells.

  

Proton Pump inhibitors- These medicines bind and inactivate the H+K+-ATPase pumps in the parietal cells, thereby inhibiting acid secretion of acid.

  

NEVER GIVE YOUR BABY ANY MEDICATION WITHOUT FIRST CONSULTING YOUR MEDICAL PRACTITIONER, to ensure that it is suitable for babies and that the dose is appropriate.

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The information in this article was reviewed for medical accuracy by, Paediatrician and Allergy Specialist, Dr Claudia Gray (MBChB (UCT), MRCPCH (London), MScClin Pharm(Surrey), DipPaedNutrition (UK), PostgradDipAllergy (Southampton), Certified Paediatric Allergologist (SA))

Dr Gray works at the allergy clinic at the Red Cross Children's Hospital in Cape Town, and has a private practice at Vincent Pallotti Hospital in Cape Town, contact 021 531 8013.