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Detecting an Auditory Processing Disorder

Children with APD are thought to hear normally because they can usually detect pure tones that are delivered one by one in a very quiet environment (such as a sound-treated room). Those who can normally detect sounds and recognize speech in ideal listening conditions are not considered to have hearing difficulties.


However, the ability to detect the presence of sounds is only one part of the processing that occurs in the auditory system. So, most children with APD do not have a loss of hearing sensitivity, but have a hearing problem in the sense that they do not process auditory information normally.
If the auditory deficits aren't identified and managed early, many of these children will have speech and language delays and academic problems.
Symptoms of APD can range from mild to severe and can take many different forms. If you think your child might have a problem processing sounds, consider these questions:


Is your child easily distracted or unusually bothered by loud or sudden noises?
1. Are noisy environments upsetting to your child?
2. Does your child's behaviour and performance improve in quieter settings?
3. Does your child have difficulty following directions, whether simple or complicated?
4. Does your child have reading, spelling, writing, or other speech-language difficulties?
5. Is abstract information difficult for your child to comprehend?
6. Are verbal (word) math problems difficult for your child?
7. Is your child disorganized and forgetful?
8. Are conversations hard for your child to follow?


APD is an often misunderstood problem because many of the behaviours noted above also can appear in other conditions like learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and even depression. Although APD is often confused with ADHD, it is possible to have both. It is also possible to have APD and specific language impairment or learning disabilities.

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The information in this article was kindly provided by The South African Speech, Language, Hearing Association. For further information kindly contact them on: 0861 113 297 or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.